UNIST Researchers Make Single-Atom-Thick Zinc Oxide Layer on Graphene

A team from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has developed a novel method for fabricating an oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick.

The development may open up new possibilities for creating flexible, thin, and electronic devices, such as ultra-small sensors. Professor Zonghoon Lee of Materials Science and Engineering at UNIS lead the team that created the new ultra-thin oxide semiconductors.

UNIST--atom resolution image of zinc oxide layer on graphene misoriented by 30 percent

UNIST–atom resolution image of zinc oxide layer on graphene misoriented by 30 percent

The researchers employed atomic layer deposition to grow the single-atom-thick ZnO layer directly on graphene. According to the team, the ZnO film is the thinnest ever heteroepitaxial layer of semiconducting oxide on monolayer graphene.

“Flexible, high-performance devices are indispensable for conventional wearable electronics, which have been attracting attention recently,” said Professor Lee. “With this new material, we can achieve truly high-performance flexible devices.” 

The team detailed the development in an article in Nano Letters.

Reference

Hyo-Ki Hong et al., “Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene,” Nano Letters, 2017, 17 (1), pp 120–127. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03621.